Fall 2019 Catalog

Fall 2019 Catalog

Course Dates: Sept 13, 20, 27; Oct 4, 18, 25; Nov 8
Fall Registration: August 1 - 15, 2019
Course Enrollment Confirmation: August 22, 2019

Click on any of the titles below to see expanded information. There is a print button on the bottom of the page.

LLI members pay an annual membership fee of $175.

Members with financial need can apply for a scholarship by emailing info@lli.bard.edu. Your email will be forwarded to the President of LLI, who will get in touch with you.

The mission of the Lifetime Learning Institute at Bard College is:

  • to provide enriching educational and social experiences in a community of mature adults by offering noncredit and noncompetitive courses under the sponsorship of Bard College;
  • to encourage members to volunteer, according to their individual skills and interests; and
  • to share ideas and experiences with students of all ages.

LLI is an all-volunteer, member-run organization that encourages active participation. Our presenters volunteer from our membership, the community, and the Bard faculty. LLI organizes two seven-week semesters, a winter intersession, a summer series, and occasional special events.

At Bard, LLI is part of the Center for Civic Engagement, one of many CCE programs that engage communities locally, nationally, and internationally. LLI is also affiliated with the Road Scholar Institute Network, a national organization that facilitates communication with similar groups.

  • Dean Stuart Stritzler-Levine Seniors-to-Seniors Grant: Five graduating seniors receive grants to help them complete their Senior Projects. A Bard College committee chooses the recipients, who may use the funds as needed. Prior to Commencement, the recipients present their Projects at a high tea hosted by LLI.
  • Bard High School Early College Summer Intern Incentive: BHSEC in New York City offers selected students the opportunity to graduate with two years of college credit. During the summer before their final year, students may participate in unpaid internships. LLI provides a small stipend to four students to help with their expenses during this time.
  • Bard Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) Community Action Awards: support for student internships, travel, and other costs, and support for other CCE programs.
  • Bard College Conservatory of Music: ongoing general support.
  • Bertelsmann Campus Center: technical upgrades to conference rooms and classrooms.
  • Bard College Fund for Visual Learning: art materials for students.
  • Joan Tower Composition Scholarship Fund: general support.
  • Montgomery Place: funding for archival materials.

Period 1

8:30 a.m. until 9:50 a.m.

Friday: 8:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m. (Class starts at 8:50)

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement® is a relaxing, mindful way to improve how you move and how you feel in your body. It works through a combination of slowing down, reducing effort, and paying attention to sensation as you are guided verbally through fundamental movement patterns. Relief from chronic discomfort, greater ease in daily activities, and better posture and breathing are among the many benefits. An emphasis on comfort and ease makes Awareness Through Movement® especially beneficial for aging bodies. Classes take place on floor mats.

Class Limit: 20

Presenter:  Margaret Pierpont is a Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioner who offers group classes and private sessions in the Rhinebeck area. She has had a lifelong interest in relaxation, movement, and the body-mind relationship and has extensive experience in dance, yoga, and meditation. She likes the way Awareness Through Movement® keeps her mind and body nimble in retirement.

Producer:  Margaret Shuhala

Friday: 8:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Five American presidents committed the United States to a war in Vietnam that lasted 30 years. The war devastated two countries (the US and Vietnam), four presidents (Johnson, Nixon, Diem, and Thieu), and the consensus that unified Americans in the early Cold War. Debate over the war and its meaning for Americans continues to this day. The course will explore why the US chose to fight this war, why it fought in the way that it did, what the war cost, and why it lost.

Presenter:  Mark Lytle, PhD, taught American history, American studies, and environmental history at Bard for over 40 years. He began teaching a course on the Vietnam War shortly after it ended. 

Producer:  Marge Moran

Friday: 8:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Would you like to create a documentary that tells a story? There are skills and techniques you can easily learn, with results similar to those of network video journalists. Today’s mobile technology enables you to use your smartphone as a video camera, sound recorder, and video editor all in one. Final editing is easier on a desktop or laptop, but you can use tablets like the iPad or Surface to finish your documentary (please see “Video Editing Workshop,” 3rd period).

Class Limit: 15

Presenter:  Gary Miller (LLI) is a veteran photojournalist, filmmaker and live television director with over 40 years of experience for clients like The New York Stock Exchange, Time, Newsweek, Fortune 500 companies, museums and galleries. He has taught at The New School for Social Research on freelance photography and is author of a book on the same subject.

Producer:  Dorothy Baran

Period 2

10:10 a.m. until 11:30 a.m.

Friday: 10:10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

This course will posit what the global role of America should be through this century. It will begin with an overview of the current domestic political situation. America’s historical role in the global order will be considered. The domestic and global threats as identified by US intelligence agencies will be analyzed. The last three sessions will be dedicated to class members’ discussion of domestic and global issues with an emphasis on defining America’s global role.

Presenter: D. Michael Simpler (LLI) is a retired airline captain with 38 years of worldwide flying experience with Pan Am and Delta Airlines. He flew frequently to the Soviet Union and East European communist countries. He has offered courses at Bard LLI, Marist CLS, SUNY New Paltz LLI, and Saugerties Lifespring on Global Aviation, the Cold War and the Military-Industrial Complex.

Producer:  Emily Michael

Friday: 10:10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

The class will discuss current economic issues from an economic rather than a political point of view. Students will apply the basic principles of college-level economics to many of the problems that confront society today.

Class Limit: 20

Presenter: Andrew Weintraub is a former professor of economics at Temple University, a forensic economist who specializes in estimating the value of lost earnings, a magician, and the founder and past president of The CENTER for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck.

Producer:  Marge Moran

Friday: 10:10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Flash fiction is a fictional work of extreme brevity. For purposes of this course, stories will be limited to 300-500 words. It is not necessary to be a practiced writer, but members need to commit to bringing in a new piece each session. Writing prompts will be given for each assignment, and members will provide copies of their work for class discussion. There is joy in writing and an openhearted effort is more important here than skill.

Class Limit: 10

Presenter:  Victoria Sullivan, PhD, (LLI) has taught a number of literature courses at Bard LLI, and prior to that was a college professor of literature and creative writing. She’s had seven Equity productions of her plays, four published chapbooks, and regular poetry readings in the Hudson Valley; she co-hosts a radio talk show on WDST Radio Woodstock (100.1 FM).

Producer:  Margaret Shuhala

Friday: 10:10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Opera has been a major art form in Western society for over 400 years, with much to say about politics. Part III of this course continues to look at governmental, sexual, economic, and religious politics as expressed in opera. It includes a close examination of important 19th and 20th century operas and a look at the current state of opera as a political vehicle. Students will experience operatic video performances in class as political themes are developed.

Presenter:  Chuck Mishaan (LLI) has been an opera aficionado since the days of $2.00 tickets at the old Metropolitan Opera House. He briefly appeared in a nonsinging role on stage at the new Met and is a regular attendee at this world-class venue. He was an adjunct professor at NYU, teaching health care technology, and consults with health care providers.

Producer:  Chuck Mishaan

Friday: 10:10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Join us on an exciting trip into mood, metaphor, meter, and tone. Discover how exploratory exercises can lead you into nonlinear use of words that may surprise and enable you to express your deepest thoughts and feelings. Come for the art of it. Come to read skilled poets and fall in love with poetry. Come for the assignments, support, feedback. Come to write poetry only you can write. All levels welcome.

Class Limit: 15

Presenter: Anique Taylor’s writing has been published in numerous literary magazines and anthologies. She brings her experience as an artist, poet and Spiritual Life Coach to her teaching. She holds MFAs in Poetry (Drew) and Drawing (Pratt). In chapbook competitions Where Space Bends was chosen finalist by Minerva Rising and Blue Light Press and Under the Ice Moon was chosen finalist by Blue Light Press.

Producer:  Ellen Foreman

Period 3

11:50 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Friday: 11:50 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Each week the class will consider an aspect of math or science.

September 13: Melting Time: Exploring Black Holes with the Rhythms of Clocks

Presenter: Hal Haggard, PhD, Assistant Professor of Physics

September 20: Entropy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

Presenter: Matthew Deady, PhD, Professor of Physics; Director, Physics Program

September 27: Emerging Threats to Water Quality

Presenter: Robyn Smyth, PhD, Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental and Urban Studies; Faculty, Bard Center for Environmental Policy

October 4: Looking for the Mechanisms of Depression

Presenter: Justin Dainer-Best, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychology; Director, the Affective Science Lab

October 18: Nanotechnology

Presenter: Christopher LaFratta, PhD, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

October 25: New Ways of Doing Old Math

Presenter: Mary Krembs, PhD, Director, Citizen Science and Mathematics Faculty, Master of Arts in Teaching Program

Novermber 8:  Mathematics of Puzzles and Games

Presenter: Lauren Rose, PhD, Associate Professor, Mathematics Program

Producer:  Cathy Reinis

Friday: 11:50 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Creative movement will activate the imagination through words and music and allow the participants to discover their signature movement style. This improvisational style will offer playfulness, joy, self awareness and laughter. All are welcome to this course of experimentation. The participants will progress to dance art forms that have meaning for the individuals like an art form collage. Bring a yoga mat or towel and dress comfortably. Also bring a notebook for private journaling.

Class Limit: 12

Presenter:  Helen Adams O’Keefe, MA, (LLI) has a lifetime experience in integrating dance and movement into self-awareness for a variety of groups.

Producer:  Linda Legendre

Friday: 11:50 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

The class will read and discuss stories from the US, Africa, and other countries. We’ll examine several questions: Why does the behavior of folktale characters depart so far from the real-life behavior of an audience? How does folklore handle conflicts in the surrounding society? Why are the actors, incidents, and objects in folktales not the same in different cultures? We’ll discover how the parts combine to affect the audience. Online readings and printed texts will be used for discussion. A reading list will be provided.

Class Limit: 22

Presenter:  Lee Haring, Professor Emeritus of English, Brooklyn College CUNY, has conducted folklore fieldwork in Kenya, Madagascar, and Mauritius. He has published numerous articles and books on folklore, and has taught at the University of California Berkeley, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Connecticut.

Producer:  Ellen Foreman

Friday: 11:50 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

This course will explore the images of the Goddess in world religions such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, traditional African religions, and Native American traditions. It will look at both iconography and literary texts to examine how the Goddess as a representation of the Divine affects women’s spirituality and the larger culture. It will also familiarize students with the re-emergence of the G/goddess in the western world as an element of various eco-theological, sacred feminist, and new spiritual movements.

Class Limit: 24

Presenter:  Neela Bhattacharya Saxena, PhD, is professor of English and Women’s Studies at Nassau Community College. She has published several articles and two books, Absent Mother God of the West: A Kali Lover’s Journey into Christianity and Judaism, and In the Beginning is Desire: Tracing Kali’s Footprints in Indian Literature.

Producer:  Dorothy Baran

Friday: 11:50 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Editing is a critical factor in the documentary genre, but often bewildering for the beginning video enthusiast. Storyboarding, interview segmenting, covering visuals with photographs or other video, narration, music, and graphics are at the core of video editing skills, and when skillfully applied to any video project, result in a broadcast quality project. Designed as an adjunct to “Smartphone Video Journalism” (1st period), it is open to anyone looking for an introduction to video editing on a laptop, desktop, or tablet.

Class Limit: 15

Presenter:  Gary Miller (LLI) is a veteran photojournalist, filmmaker and live television director with over 40 years of experience for clients like The New York Stock Exchange, Time, Newsweek, Fortune 500 companies, museums and galleries. He has taught at The New School for Social Research on freelance photography and is author of a book on the same subject.

Producer:  Dorothy Baran

Friday: 11:50 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

In an early work, Auden quoted Montaigne’s aphorism about human contradictions. His poetry is, one critic says, “pregnant with meaning” in an “atmosphere, magical, like a tale of enchantment.” The class will read short poems aloud and make observations about them together. Students may use any edition of Selected Poems co-authored by Edward Mendelson. A reading list will be sent to the participants.

Class Limit: 15

Presenter:  Rosemary Deen did her graduate studies at the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago. She taught in the English department of Queens College CUNY. Her book of essays is Naming The Light. She is the poetry editor of Commonweal magazine.

Producer:   Ellen Foreman

Period 4

1:40 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

Friday: 1:40 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

This course will provide an in-depth assessment by knowledgeable local representatives of the current state, importance, and likely development of our region’s agriculture.

September 13: Building a Regenerative Regional Food System

Regenerative agriculture  and local varieties preserve our region’s historic advantages in food production and protect the environment overall.

Presenters: Megan Larmer and Lynda Prim: Megan Larmer is Director of Regional Food Programs and Lynda Prim is Director of Glynwood’s Farm, where regenerative agriculture and farmer training are practiced.

September 20: Food Systems and Farm Models

The presenter will describe how food systems and farm models function and their impact on transforming the culture of places.

Presenter: Leonard Nevarez, PhD, is Vassar College Professor of Sociology. He examines markets, formal organizations, and labor production. He is currently conducting the Poughkeepsie food security survey.

September 27: History of Agriculture

In this region, historic landscapes evolved from crop and sheep farms to specialized dairy farming, orchards, vineyards, and organic farms.

Presenter: Joshua Simons is Senior Research Associate of the SUNY New Paltz Benjamin Center. He holds a Master of Public Administration from Marist College.

October 4: Hudson Valley’s AgriBusiness

Practical economic development programs and projects that are focused on farms can generate local food business as vibrant economic development.

Presenter: Todd Erling is Executive Director of Hudson Valley AgriBusiness Development Corporation and has raised millions of dollars to assist ag-related/ag-dependent businesses in the region.

October 18: Beyond Soil Carbon

This session will discuss the methods and means of designing farming systems to enhance ecosystem services.

Presenter: Jennifer Phillips, PhD, has a doctorate from Cornell in soil, crop, and atmospheric sciences. Phillips’ local farm aligns perfectly with her position as Assistant Professor at the Bard Center for Environmental Policy.

October 25: Young Farmers and the National Young Farmers Coalition (NYFC)

Young farmers, faced with many challenges, find support in the policies, networks, and services of the NYFC.

Presenter: Caitlin Arnold is National Chapter Manager of the NYFC, a job that presents the broad array of problems, issues, and challenges confronting young farmers nationwide.

November 8: The Farmers’ and Chefs’ Movement

The farm-to-table locavore movement is now an epicenter for the local organic sustainable farm movement.

Presenter: Janet Crawshaw, a conservationist and journalist, founded The Valley Table magazine in the late 1990s and launched the Hudson Valley Restaurant Week in 2006.

Producer:   Regina Armstrong

Friday: 1:40 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

“The world is too dangerous for anything but the truth and too small for anything but brotherhood.” W.S. Coffin

What does it mean to live an undefended life? Imagine being so undefended that you have no need to pretend or arm yourself. Imagine your heart free to love and express itself. To live an authentic life we need to let go of defenses that keep us separate from each other. In this class, you will have the opportunity to observe your defenses and safely let them go.

Class Limit: 30

Presenter:  Judith Garten has taught and counseled for over 40 years in a discipline illuminated by Moira Shaw’s The 50-50 Work. She has worked with groups as diverse as the Hutus and Tutsis of Rwanda and the Harvard Business School Alumni Forum. Judith has taught at the Manhattan School of Music and Pace University and at growth centers worldwide. See www.JudithGarten.com

Producer:  Merrill Mishaan

Friday: 1:40 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

This course is for those who would like to make music with others, whether or not they have ever played a musical instrument. Participants will explore their hidden talents for songwriting by putting their songs to rhythm and melody. They’ll learn to create simple rhythms that can be played in countless musical situations and will experience how a professional recording studio works, all while working with others in a noncompetitive, cooperative, and enjoyable way.

Class Limit: 20

Presenter:  Nathan Brenowitz, a former Juilliard student, is a trumpet player and percussionist who holds a master’s degree in counseling. He has studied and performed around the world and has presented at LLI several times. He played with the Woodstock Chamber Orchestra and Creative Music Studio Orchestra, and is now a member of the “jazzy blues” band Pops and the Weasel.

Producer:   Dorothy Baran

Friday: 1:40 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

This course will examine developments related to and stemming from the Enlightenment period, in science, art, music, literature, and philosophy.

September 13: Science Sets the Stage for Enlightenment Thinking

Presenter: George Rose, PhD, Johns Hopkins University Krieger-Eisenhower Professor Emeritus; JHU Academy and Research Professor and Bard alumnus, has received international recognition for his research and numerous publications.

September 20: Science Poses a Challenge to Enlightenment Thinking

Presenter: George Rose

September 27: Revolutions: Political History in the Age of Enlightenment

Presenter: Greg Moynahan, PhD, is Bard College  Associate Professor of History and Co-Director of the Science, Technology and Society Program.

October 4: Art in the Age of Enlightenment

Presenter: Susan Merriam, PhD, is Bard College  Associate Professor of Art History. She has published on 17th-century still life and anatomical painting.

October 18: Music in the Age of Enlightenment

Presenter: Leon Botstein, PhD, is Leon Levy Professor in the Arts and Humanities, and has been president of Bard College since 1975. He is an internationally recognized conductor and historian.

October 25: The Mirrors of Critique: Literary and Cultural Reflections on the Enlightenment Project

Presenter: Robert Hardwick Weston, is Bard College Associate Professor and Director of Gender and Sexuality Studies, specializing in literature and culture of the European Enlightenment.

November 8: Philosophy in the Age of Enlightenment

Presenter: Greg Moynahan

Producer:   Emily Michael

Friday: 1:40 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Based on the work of Lee Glickstein’s Speaking Circles®, Sanford Meisner, late revered American teacher of acting, and the practices of Rumi, poet of the Sufi tradition, this course uses exercises to bring ease and satisfaction to your speaking, whomever your audience. Allow silence and discover speech. Content is secondary; presence is primary. No interruptions, no criticism.

Class Limit: 8

Presenter:  Trish Hawkins was a leading actress with the Circle Repertory Company in NYC, originating roles in the plays of company member Lanford Wilson. She starred with Judd Hirsch in Wilson’s Talley’s Folly on Broadway. She acted in regional theaters, was assistant professor of theater at the University of Iowa and trained as facilitator of Speaking Circles® with Lee Glickstein.

Producer:   Ellen Foreman

Friday: 1:40 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Tai Chi is a blood-freshening moving meditation and slow-motion martial art. It promotes longevity and increases cognition, strength, confidence, balance, and flexibility. These gentle, stress-lowering exercises allow the chi or life force to follow the blood in the body, rather than stagnate, so one heals from the inside out. Students who commit to regularly attend classes will enjoy learning this long, elegant form of Yang Style Tai Chi.

Class Limit: 30

Presenter:  Annie LaBarge (LLI) is a poet and a painter who has taught art at the high school and college level. She studied Tai Chi with Joe Mansfield, Margaret Cheo, and Michael Porter. She currently teaches at Health Alliance Hospital’s Oncology Support Program. Her unique background includes all three of the Yang Style forms of Tai Chi.

Producer:  Jane Diamond

Friday: 1:40 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

This course will review the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) since the term was created at a 1956 conference at Dartmouth College. It will review AI’s successes and failures. It will clarify the relationships and differences among such terms as “artificial intelligence,” “algorithm,” “machine learning,” “neural network,” and others. It will examine current areas of AI application. It will explore the social, economic, and political significance of AI and address its dangers and ethical implications.

Presenter:  John Bassler, PhD, is a retired professor of applied statistics and marketing research. He taught in the Tuck School at Dartmouth and in the Yale School of Management, and he directed the graduate program in marketing research at the University of Texas at Arlington. In June 2018 he gave a presentation on AI in the Bard LLI SummerFest.

Producer:  Bill Tuel

Period 5

3:10 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Friday: 3:10 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

This course will examine the relationship between the national and state governments. It will begin with developing an understanding of the framework of the Constitution and the major events and Enlightenment thinking that led the framers to create it. Finally, the class will connect current events to late 18th century thinking about the separation of duties and limits on power.

Class Limit: 30

Presenter:  Robert Beaury is a retired high school social studies teacher and adjunct at Columbia-Greene College.

Producer:  Susan Hinkle

Friday: 3:10 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

This course is a continuation of a 2019 spring semester course and expands upon the creative, unfolding process of developing a unified series of images. If  “a picture is worth a thousand words,” what inspires the photographer to make a series of photographs on a specific topic or subject matter? What compels the expanded form? This course is open to any photographer seeking to discover their point of view. Weekly assignments, critiques, and presentations of master photographers’ series will enhance the participants’ experience.

Class Limit: 10

Presenter:  Lauren Piperno (LLI) photographer/educator, lives in Kingston. Permanent collections include MoMA (NY), Brooklyn Museum, Bibliothéque Nationale. Features include Photo District News, Smithsonian, Philadelphia Inquirer. Honors include FSA Documentary Photography Conference, FDR Library; American-Scandinavian Fellowship. Co-author Masked Culture, Greenwich Village Halloween Parade. Piperno’s educator credits include Parsons, Ramapo College, SUNY New Paltz, ICP, Center for Photography at Woodstock, Bard LLI. See http://www.laurenpiperno.com/

Producer:  Dorothy Baran

Friday: 3:10 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

This course will examine the basics of tea – its origin, harvesting, import, preparation, and taste. Each class will feature teas of a different region. There will be discussion of regional characteristics, history, and tips on how to select the best that each region has to offer. Participants will be led through the process of looking at teas, both dry and wet, using the senses to analyze the tea and, finally, observing how to brew the leaves properly and then tasting the result.

Class Limit: 30

Presenter:  Kim Bach was Director of Exhibitions & Programming (San Francisco Public Library) and Professor of Media Arts (Long Island University). In addition to a family connection to the tea business, Bach attended classes over two years at the Specialty Tea Institute. Since 2006, when she opened Verdigris Tea in Hudson, she has presented more than 50 tea classes and lectures.

Producer:  Emily Michael

Friday: 3:10 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

September 13, 20, 27, October 4, 18, 25 & November 8

Students develop the acting skills to perform public readings of essays, short stories, monologues, and poetry.  As they practice vocal exercises to enhance resonance and create a delivery that is conversational and real, they learn to captivate their audience with directness and simplicity and, so, find their voices.
 
Class Limit: 15
 
Presenter: Alan Lipper (LLI) has performed extensively with The CENTER for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck, 
Performing Arts of Woodstock, and Rhinebeck Readers Theatre. He has studied acting with Olympia Dukakis, 
oral interpretation with Robert Silber, and voice in many modalities.
 
Producer: Merrill Mishaan

OFF-FRIDAY CLASSES

Tuesdays:  10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon

September 17, 24, October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

Participants will visit selected Bard facilities, led by Bard staff and/or faculty.

Class Limit: 30

September 17: Manor House, Stargon, and the Bard Farm

Presenter: Katrina Light, Supervisor, Food and Agriculture Programs

September 24: Hessel Museum of Art and the Center for Curatorial Studies

Presenter: Karlene King, Administration and Development Director, Center Curatorial Studies

October 1: Montgomery Place Farm and Orchard

October 8: Stevenson Library

October 15: Jim Ottaway, Jr. Film Center and the Laszlo Z. Bito Conservatory

October 22: Fisher Studio Arts Building

October 29: New Annandale House and the Bard Experimental Humanities Program

Producers:  Cathy Reinis, Dorothy Baran

Wednesdays:  9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

September 25, October 2, 16, 23, 30 (5 hikes)

There will be a series of five hikes in the Catskill Mountains with the less difficult hikes offered first. There will be stops and a lunch break along the way. Carpooling is encouraged, leaving from both the Rhinebeck and Kingston side of the Rhinecliff Bridge. Specifics will be emailed before the first hike. Hiking locations: Devil’s Kitchen, Lake Minnewaska, Overlook Mountain, Huckleberry Point, North Lake.

Class Limit: 25

Presenter:  Jonathan Wechsler (LLI) is an avid outdoor sportsman who enjoys tennis, skiing, swimming, biking, and hiking. He is an experienced hiker who has led many hikes for LLI as well as other organizations.

Producer:  Marge Moran

Wednesdays:  10:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon

September 11, 18, 25, October 2, 16, 23 & November 6

The class will visit several churches to see stained-glass windows and learn about their history. The windows are the work of Tiffany, William Morris, LaFarge, Dodge, Clayton Bell, and others. Some are from the 13th to 16th centuries, others are modern. Opportunities to spend more time in each area to visit other sites of interest will be offered.

Class Limit: 20

Sept. 11: First Reformed Church, Kingston

Sept. 18: Trinity Episcopal Church, Saugerties

Sept. 25: St. James Episcopal, Hyde Park

Oct. 2: Christ Episcopal, Poughkeepsie

Oct. 16: Chapel of the Holy Innocents, Bard and St. John the Evangelist, Barrytown

Oct. 23: St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church, Staatsburgh

Nov. 6: Vassar College Chapel and Library, Poughkeepsie

Presenter:  Dorothy Baran (LLI) has produced many courses for LLI and is happy to repeat this course, which had been offered in 2013 and 2014. 

Producers:  Dorothy Baran, Theresa Schiller

Thursdays:  10:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon

September 12, 19, 26, October 3, 17  (5 visits)

Students will visit several horse farms and stables in the area. The first visit will be to Southlands Farm, located three miles south of the Village of Rhinebeck on Rte 9. Subsequent planned visits include Rockridge Stud in Hudson, The Horse Institute in Ancramdale, and Rivendale Riding  Academy in Clinton Corners. The final Thursday will be held at Equis Art Gallery in Red Hook. An optional lunch will follow this class.

Class Limit: 15

Producers:   Marge Moran, Jon Wechsler

Thursdays:  10:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon (except Saturday, 10/5, 10:00 to 1:00)

September 19, 26; (Sat) October 5; October 17, 24; November 7 (6 sessions)

Tours of Hudson Valley farms and food producers have been scheduled in relation to the corresponding Friday lectures. The schedule includes the following seven sites, which require drives to farm, distillery, or processor locations in Dutchess, Putnam, Ulster, and Columbia counties. The tour costs $20 because of required entry or donation fees and it will be collected at the outset of the tour, covering all admission costs. Tour starting points will be emailed to participants.

Class Limit: 20

September 19: Glynwood Farm, Cold Spring

Located at the headquarters of Glynwood, the 250-acre farm serves as the base for testing, innovating and demonstrating regenerative farming practices. The tour group will meet in the parking lot at Glynwood, 362 Glynwood Road, in Cold Spring.

September 26: Hudson Valley Fresh, Columbia County

Hudson Valley Fresh is a premium quality dairy of 10 family farms that service the greater Hudson Valley with award-winning milk.. The tour group will meet in the parking lot of Tollgate Holsteins, 136 Fox Hill Road, Ancramdale.

October 5: (Saturday) Organic Maple and Spirits Tasting, Dutchess and Ulster Counties

Madava Farms is the site of global market producer Crown Maple. Tuthilltown Spirits in Gardiner is New York’s first whiskey distillery since prohibition. The group will meet in the parking lot of Madava Farms at 47 McCourt Rd, Dover Plains, and later drive to the Visitor Center of Tuthilltown at 14 Gristmill Lane, Gardiner.

October 17: Millbrook Vineyard, Millbrook

At Millbrook in Dutchess County, we will walk the vineyards, watch the harvesting of grapes, and tour the production. The tour group will meet in the parking lot of the Millbrook Winery at 26 Wing Road, Millbrook.

October 24: Sprout Creek Farm Cheese, Poughkeepsie

Sprout Creek Farm is a working farm with free-ranging cows, sheep, goats, and other livestock; a market ;and an educational center. The group will meet at Sprout Creek Farm parking lot at 34 Lauer Road, Poughkeepsie.

November 7: Hawthorne Valley Farm CSA, Ghent, Columbia County

Hawthorne Valley Farm is a diversified 900-acre biodynamic and Animal Welfare Approved farm, providing lessons for the future of Hudson Valley farming. The group will meet in the farm parking lot at 327 County Route 21C, Ghent.

Producer:  Regina Armstrong

Saturdays:  11:50 a.m. – 1:10 p.m.

September 14, 21, 28; October 5, 19, 26 & November 9

The basic elements of the 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendments are: the right against unreasonable searches and seizures, the right against self-incrimination, the right to counsel, and the right to a jury trial. Current issues to be addressed in this class include: wiretaps, police-community relations, stop and frisk, and the major Supreme Court cases on these issues.

Class Limit: 50

Presenter: James Rogers is Deputy Commissioner for Worker Protection at the NYS Department of Labor. He previously served as Senior Advisor and Special Counsel to the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General for Social Justice under Andrew Cuomo. He worked for 10 years as a public defender and was President of the Association of Legal Aid Attorneys.

Producer:  Jane Diamond

Credits

Curriculum Committee

Anne Sunners, Chair
Irene Esposito, Secretary
Regina Armstrong
Dorothy Baran
Bob Blacker
Anne Brueckner
Jane Diamond
Ellen Foreman
Susan Hinkle
Dacie Kershaw
Linda LeGendre
Emily Michael
Merrill Mishaan
Margaret Moran
Cathy Reinis
Linda Scherr
Margaret Shuhala
Bill Tuel
Leslie Weinstock

Catalog Committee

Bill Tuel, Chair
Deborah Lanser
Grace Murphy, Catalog Editor
Margaret Shuhala
Betsy Tuel

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Join us for Fall Semester 2019

Course Dates: Sept 13, 20, 27; Oct 4, 18, 25; Nov 8
Fall Registration: August 1 - 15, 2019
Course Enrollment Confirmation: August 22, 2019


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