Fall 2020 Catalog

Fall 2020 Catalog

Course Dates: Sept 24-25, Oct 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-23, 29-30, Nov 5-6
Fall Registration starts September 1, 2020

Click on any of the titles below to see expanded information. There is a print button on the bottom of the page and also a link to the PDF Course Table.

For the Fall Semester 2020, all courses will be held virtually via Zoom.  After you have registered for a course, you will be emailed a Zoom link for joining your classes.  If you need help in using Zoom, check out our How to Zoom Guide.

The mission of the Lifetime Learning Institute at Bard College is:

  • to provide enriching educational and social experiences in a community of mature adults by offering noncredit and noncompetitive courses under the sponsorship of Bard College;
  • to encourage members to volunteer, according to their individual skills and interests; and
  • to share ideas and experiences with students of all ages.

LLI is an all-volunteer, member-run organization that encourages active participation. Our presenters volunteer from our membership, the community, and the Bard faculty. LLI organizes two seven-week semesters, a winter intersession, a summer series, and occasional special events.

At Bard, LLI is part of the Center for Civic Engagement, one of many CCE programs that engage communities locally, nationally, and internationally. LLI is also affiliated with the Road Scholar Institute Network, a national organization that facilitates communication with similar groups.

  • Dean Stuart Stritzler-Levine Seniors-to-Seniors Grant: Five graduating seniors receive grants to help them complete their Senior Projects. A Bard College committee chooses the recipients, who may use the funds as needed. Prior to Commencement, the recipients present their Projects at a high tea hosted by LLI.
  • Bard High School Early College Summer Intern Incentive: BHSEC in New York City offers selected students the opportunity to graduate with two years of college credit. During the summer before their final year, students may participate in unpaid internships. LLI provides a small stipend to four students to help with their expenses during this time.
  • Bard Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) Community Action Awards: support for student internships, travel, and other costs, and support for other CCE programs.
  • Bard College Conservatory of Music: ongoing general support.
  • Bertelsmann Campus Center: technical upgrades to conference rooms and classrooms.
  • Bard College Fund for Visual Learning: art materials for students.
  • Joan Tower Composition Scholarship Fund: general support.
  • Montgomery Place: funding for archival materials.

LLI members have paid a reduced annual membership fee of $125 for our 2020-21 membership year. Only members can register for Fall and Spring classes. 

Members with financial need can apply for a scholarship by emailing info@lli.bard.edu. Your email will be forwarded to the President of LLI, who will get in touch with you.

THURSDAY, Period 1

9:00 a.m. until 10:30 a.m.

Thursday, First Period: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

September 24; October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; November 5

Description: Yoga can be a valuable addition to our toolbox for practice of self-care. This class will highlight different yoga techniques to support healing and health. Topics covered will be yoga for a better back, yoga to relieve stress and anxiety, yoga practices for stronger bones, and yoga for depression. Restorative Yoga, Yoga Nidra, and One Focus Meditation will be among techniques introduced.

Class Limit: 20

Presenter:  Susan Blacker (LLI) began her yoga teacher training at Kripalu Center for Yoga Health. She was certified to teach in 2002. Susan continues to take workshops in Yoga of Heart Cardiac & Cancer, Healing Art of Yoga, Yoga for a Better Back, and for Students with Health Challenges. She teaches classes in Woodstock and Saugerties and gentle yoga classes from home.

Producer: Jane Diamond

Thursday, First Period: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

September 24; October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; November 5

Description: One test of leadership is the ability to grasp the major crises of the time and respond effectively: Lincoln and the Civil War, Theodore Roosevelt and regulatory reform, FDR and the Depression and WW II, JFK and the Cuban missile crisis, Jeff Bezos and Amazon, and, as a comparative example, Joe Biden and the swine flu crisis vs. Donald Trump and the COVID-19 crisis.

Class Limit:  none

Presenter: Mark Lytle, PhD, is a retired Bard professor with an interest in American politics, culture, and environment.

Producer: Marge Moran

Thursday, First Period: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

September 24; October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; November 5

Description: Pioneer suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Marie Curie, aviator Amelia Earhart, Life magazine photographer Margaret Bourke-White, and Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg are among the strong women whose lives have provided inspiration for millions.  But how about the women who told these stories? How and why were they successful? This course illuminates the stories of these women, told through writing, artwork, photography, and video journalism.

Class Limit: none

Presenter: Gary Miller (LLI) is a veteran photojournalist, filmmaker, and live television director with more than 40 years of experience for clients like the New York Stock Exchange, Time, Newsweek, Fortune 500 companies, museums, and galleries. He has taught freelance photography at The New School and is the author of a book on the same subject.

Producer: Dorothy Baran

THURSDAY, Period 2

11:00 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.

Thursday, Second Period: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 24; October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; November 5

Description: This is a continuation of the Fall 2019 course (not a prerequisite). It will begin with a review of the basics of global power and then focus on the effects of the Trump presidency and the COVID-19 pandemic. How domestic politics influence foreign relations will be examined in the context of how the United States can emerge from this period. Class discussion and member input will be encouraged.

Class Limit: none

Presenter: D. Michael Simpler (LLI) is a retired airline captain with 38 years of worldwide flying experience with Pan Am and Delta Airlines. He flew frequently to the Soviet Union and East European communist countries. He has offered courses at Bard LLI, Marist, CLS, SUNY, New Paltz LLI, and Saugerties Lifespring on Global Aviation, the Cold War, and the Military-Industrial Complex.

Producer: Emily Michael

Thursday, Second Period: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 24; October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; November 5

Description: In this course, rather than view the economy from the vantage point of firms and households, a “micro” view, we’ll take an overall, i.e., “macro” view. We’ll discuss the concept of gross domestic product: how it’s measured, the factors that determine it, and government’s role in influencing it through both monetary and fiscal policy. In addition, we’ll spend time exploring the differences between centrally planned and free market economies.

*** Students MUST have taken a prior course in Economics from the presenter.

Class Limit: 30

Presenter: Andy Weintraub, PhD, has taught economics at the university level for 40 years. He is currently an economic consultant, specializing in forensic economics. When not engaged in economics pursuits, he practices his skills as a magician, an interest he has cultivated since childhood.

Producer: Marge Moran

Thursday, Second Period: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Note: this is a one-hour class.)

September 24; October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; November 5

Description: This one-hour course is for people who would like to enjoy the benefits of meditation but find the practice too difficult. A variety of techniques for quieting the body and mind will be explored to help participants create a practice that is personally meaningful. Students will learn how to pay attention and develop awareness—the essence of meditation—while moving and staying still, lying down, sitting, and walking. Developing ways to find mental calm and physical ease while sitting still will be one of the goals. Students will need a straight-back chair for sitting and a mat or rug on the floor for lying down. For people who cannot easily get up and down to the floor, a firm bed will do fine.

Class Limit: 20

Presenter: Margaret Pierpont (LLI) has had a sustained interest in movement, relaxation, and the body-mind relationship from her college years as a dancer, through a professional career as a writer and editor, to her retirement avocation as a teacher of Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement®. She began meditating 30 years ago and is a graduate of the Integrated Study and Practice Program at the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies.

Producer: Margaret Shuhala

Thursday, Second Period: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 24; October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; November 5

Description: Opera as Politics begins its sixth year at Bard LLI. We will discuss selected operas in the context of governmental, sexual, economic, racial, and religious politics, and examine what these operas have to say to us today. Planned lectures include discussions of Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Verdi’s Nabucco and Don Carlo, Wagner’s Die Walküre, Puccini’s Madama Butterfly and Turandot, Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, Glass’s Satyagraha, and Adams’s Doctor Atomic. Opera excerpts will be presented as political themes are developed.

Class Limit:  none

Presenter: Chuck Mishaan (LLI) is developing a syllabus examining the intellectual, political, and artistic history of Western Europe from the period of the Enlightenment to the present day. He has been presenting his popular classroom series on Opera as Politics at Bard LLI and many other area LLIs, and is a guest lecturer at Bardavon and the Rhinebeck Chamber Music Society.

Producer: Chuck Mishaan

Thursday, Second Period: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 24; October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; November 5

This course examines some  pitfalls of  mass market tourism and traces the impacts of the responsible travel movement. It also looks at two challenges facing the  industry: overtourism and climate change.

Sept. 24: Overview of Origins, Growth, and Impact of Ecotourism/Responsible Travel

October 1: Costa Rica: An Ecotourism Superpower

October 8: Cruise Tourism and Sustainable Tourism in the Caribbean

October 15: Cuba: Travel as a Foreign Policy Tool

October 22: Setting Standards: Eco-Certification Program and Travelers’ Philanthropy

October 29: Overtourism and Climate Change

November 5: How to be a Responsible Traveler

Class Limit:  none

Presenter: Martha Honey (LLI) is director of Responsible Travel Consulting based in Rhinebeck, New York. She is also director emeritus and co-founder and former executive director (2003- 2019) of the Center for Responsible Travel (CREST), a nonprofit organization headquartered in Washington, DC.

Producer: Emily Michael

FRIDAY, Period 1

9:00 a.m. until 10:30 a.m.

Friday: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description:  Each week the class will consider an aspect of math or science.

September 25: The Science of Looking under Paintings

Presenter: Simeen Sattar, Professor of Chemical Physics

October 2: Attention and Aging

Presenter: Thomas Hutcheon, Assistant Professor of Psychology

October 9: Coloring Mathematical Knots

Presenter: Caitlin Leverson, Assistant Professor of Mathematics

October 16:  All in the Details: How Measuring Anything in Physics Can reveal Something about Nature

Presenter: Antonios Kontos, Assistant Professor of Physics

October 23: Puzzles, Games and Mathematics: Keeping Your Brain Sharp During the Coronavirus Era

Presenter: Lauren Rose, Associate Professor of Mathematics

October 30: Snookering Quantum Mechanics: Ronnie “The Rocket” O’Sullivan, Chaos, and Quantum Billiards

Presenter: Hal Haggard, Assistant Professor of Physics

November 6: Healthy People = Healthy Planet

Presenter: Eli Dueker, Assistant Professor, Environmental and Urban Studies & Biology Programs; Program Director, EUS; Director, Bard Center for the Study of Land, Air and Water

Class Limit:  none

Producer:  Cathy Reinis

Friday: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: Spend an hour and 30 minutes on improving your health. We will explore different aspects of living a healthy life – from the way we eat, to the way we sleep, exercise, and reduce stress — led each week by a different medical professional with a wide breadth of expertise. Leave each class feeling empowered to make small changes toward becoming a healthier you.

September 25: Season Your Way to Great Health 

Learn from NDH nutritionist Roufia Payman what herbs, spices and vitamins are essential to healthy aging to live longer, feel better and reverse the aging process.

Presenter: Roufia Payman, DT, CDN, Supervisor, Outpatient Nutrition Counseling, Northern Dutchess Hospital

October 2: Is It a Medical Emergency, or Not?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many people put off their healthcare needs, even when they shouldn’t have. Now more than ever, it’s so important to know, when you are sick or hurt, whether an urgent care or emergency department is the best choice. In this lecture, you’ll learn how to recognize signs and symptoms of a medical emergency.

Presenter: David Templeton, MD, Emergency Medicine Physician and Emergency Department Director, Northern Dutchess Hospital

October 9: What’s Keeping You Awake?

As we age we tend to have a harder time falling asleep and more trouble staying asleep than when we were younger. We also may be less satisfied with sleep and more tired during the day. We’ll explore what contributes to sleep disturbances and problems and provide tips on what to do about them.

Presenters: Angeli Kalra, MD, and Rabjot (Nikki) Rai, MD, Family Medicine Residency Program at Nuvance Health

October 16: Sexual Health

While sexuality and sexual health for the older adult is often seen as a taboo topic and therefore not addressed at most wellness visits, it is a vital part of life even as we age. We can discuss common concerns as well as current guidelines.

Presenter: Rachel Moscicki, Nurse Practitioner, Nuvance Health Center for Healthy Aging

October 23: Overcoming Barriers to Exercise

Given the overwhelming evidence, we should all be physically active. It’s essential if you want to live a healthy and happier life. However, the realities of daily life and additional barriers often get in the way of our best intentions to be more active. We’ll share how to overcome some of the most common challenges that prevent us from achieving our fitness goals, including lack of motivation, low energy, physical limitations and access to appropriate environments for exercise.

Presenter: Melissa Poland, RN, Cardiac Rehabilitation Coordinator, Northern Dutchess Hospital

 October 30: Meditation, Breath Work, and Self-Love

This workshop will offer meditation and breath work, while exploring how we can be better at self-love. Learn how to appreciate your body, be aware of your mind and make peace with your life. 

Presenter: Liz Levine, MD, a yoga instructor and hospitalist, Northern Dutchess Hospital

November 6: Remedies for Cold Weather Aches and Pain

Winter is coming and for many people, that means dealing with more aches, pains and stiffness. Knees, hands and feet are the most common places people tend to feel pain when the temperatures drop. Learn how to prepare the body for cold weather, alleviate painful joint symptoms and lessen the effects of aging joints so you can live a healthier, more active lifestyle.

Presenters: Hannah Landon, Occupational Therapist, and Christina Rankey, Physical Therapist, Northern Dutchess Hospital

Class Limit:  none

Producer: Emily Michael

Friday: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: Our current civil war began on November 8, 2016. When it ends the nation will go through a reconstruction period. Will the next reconstruction impose a 19th-century-style harsh peace with lasting consequences? Might it break with past examples and be a period of enlightened leadership with progress for all?

We will compare the social, economic, and political causes of the 19th-century war with the current civil war. The class will also examine 19th-century Reconstruction and discuss future reconstruction possibilities.

Class Limit:  none

Presenter: Robert Beaury (LLI) is a retired Social Studies teacher from Germantown Central School and former adjunct at Columbia-Greene Community College.

Producer: Emily Michael

Friday: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: Join us on an exciting trip into mood, metaphor, meter, and tone. Discover how exploratory exercises can lead you into the nonlinear use of words that may surprise and enable you to express your deepest thoughts and feelings. Come for the art of it. Come to read skilled poets and fall in love with poetry. Come for the assignments, support, and feedback. Come to write poetry only you can write. All levels welcome.

Class Limit: 15

Presenter: Anique Sara Taylor’s (LLI) writing has been published in numerous literary magazines and anthologies. Her chapbooks, Where Space Bends and Under the Ice Moon, have won awards. Where Space Bends, her first book, was published by Finishing Line Press, May 2020. She teaches poetry, creative nonfiction, and the creative journal, bringing her experience as an artist, poet, and spiritual life coach to her teaching.

Producer: Emily Michael

FRIDAY, Period 2

11:00 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.

Friday: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: In this course, we will discuss the underlying causes of antisemitism, from the Age of Antiquity (before the birth of Jesus), to the alt-right, the ultra-left, and the global jihad of today.

Class Limit: none

Presenter: Steven Bassin (LLI) is an attorney and writer who has taught numerous courses at various universities over the last 50 years. He has also taught LLI courses at The New School, Vassar, and Bard. Most recently he taught mystery fiction courses on Dickens, Hammett/Chandler, and Conan Doyle/Sherlock Holmes as well as a course on the House Un-American Activities Committee and the McCarthy era.

Producer: Margaret Shuhala

Friday: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: Tune up your awareness and understanding of the threats and challenges our river and valley environment pose. Each week filmmaker Jon Bowermaster will feature different short films from his Hudson River Stories series and talk with invited guests on the variety of subjects.

Class Limit: none

Presenter: Jon Bowermaster — Writer, filmmaker, and adventurer, Jon is a six-time grantee of the National Geographic Expeditions Council. Jon has written 11 books and directed/produced more than 30 documentary films, all with environmental backdrops. He has lived in the Hudson Valley for 32 years.

Producer: Anne Brueckner

Friday: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: Tai Chi is a blood-freshening, moving meditation and slow-motion martial art. It promotes longevity and increases cognition, strength, confidence, balance and flexibility. These gentle, stress-lowering exercises allow the chi or life force to follow the blood in the body, rather than stagnate. With tai chi we help ourselves heal from the inside out.

Class Limit: 20

Presenter: Annie LaBarge (LLI) is a poet and a painter who has taught art at the high school and college level. She studied Tai Chi with Joe Mansfield, Margaret Cheo, and Michael Porter. She is currently teaching in HealthAlliance Hospital’s Oncology Support program. Her background includes all three sets of Yang Style Long Form Tai Chi.

Producer: Jane Diamond

Friday: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 16, 30; November 6 (five sessions)

Description: This will be a discussion-based class that considers how we talk about literature, what we note, and how it affects the reader. We shall use as our subject matter three short stories by three great writers: William Faulkner’s “That Evening Sun,” D.H. Lawrence’s “The Prussian Officer,” and Alice Munro’s “Queenie.”

Class Limit: 12 (No exceptions)

Presenter: Victoria Sullivan, PhD, (LLI) a college professor of English literature for several decades, has presented 10 Bard LLI courses in writing and literature. She is a poet, playwright, improv performer, and co-host on a local radio talk show. She has performed her work at various venues in Manhattan and the Hudson Valley and has published literary criticism, theater reviews, and four poetry chapbooks.

Producer: Margaret Shuhala

Friday: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: Have you ever wondered why, as we age, we begin to forget simple things like “where did I leave the keys?” or “where are my glasses?” Scientific research into brain function shows that practice in mindfulness reenergizes brain cells, enhancing cognitive capacities while reducing stress. This course will examine select branches of this research and provide experiential tools to maximize physical and mental health, deepen relationships, and provide insight into paths of spiritual development.

Class Limit: 40

Presenter: Lyla Yastion, PhD, obtained a doctorate in anthropology at University of Albany (SUNY). She has taught anthropology and religious studies at the college level for 18 years. Lyla is the author of two books published by Hamilton Books: Pause Now: Handbook for a Spiritual Revolution and Homesick: Finding Our Way Back to a Healthy Planet. Lyla is a reiki master and is certified in mindfulness-based stress reduction.

Producer: Margaret Shuhala

Friday: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: This course is directed to White people who want to deepen their understanding of the racism experienced by Black Americans and work to further racial justice. We will explore the history and present occurrences of that racism and examine White privilege as it impacts  Black Americans. Then we will be able to address the question: What are ways we can act to build a more just America for all of us, individually and systemically. This is a discussion class; some outside reading required.

Class Limit: 14

Presenters:  Barbara Danish, PhD, (LLI) works with Family of Woodstock on the hotline and as a counselor. At Pratt Institute she developed the exploration of race as part of her education courses.

Laura Brown, MA, (LLI) past president of Oxford University Press and recent managing director of JSTOR, is currently senior advisor at JSTOR working on prison education and a civil rights database. She serves on the board of the Gordon Parks Foundation.

Producer: Ellen Foreman

Lama Tenzin at Sawkill River

FRIDAY, Period 3

1:30 p.m. until 3:00 p.m.

Friday: 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: This course will discuss how the representation of the human figure changed and developed from prehistory until today.

Class Limit: 25

Presenter:  Jose Moreno-Lacalle taught history and art history for seven years at a small private school in Manhattan. He later worked at Sotheby’s, the art auction house, for 17 years.

Producer: Dorothy Baran

Friday: 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: The course covers the basic mechanics of garden and forest plants and trees. It will cover plant evolution; naming of plants; function of cells, stems, roots and leaves; and plant reproduction. We will answer questions such as: When did plants first arrive? What makes maple syrup run? What causes fall leaves to change color? Why don’t the pipes in trees freeze in the winter?

Class Limit:  none

Presenter: Rick Jones is a retired executive of a major NYC bank with an extensive interest in botany and natural history. He has certification in both botany and ornamental horticulture from the continuing education department at the New York Botanical Gardens. He spent many years as a volunteer in the horticulture office of the NYBG and as a docent for organized and drop-in tours. He is an avid trekker/hiker both here and abroad.

Producer: Bill Tuel

Friday: 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 (six sessions)

Description:  The presenters will examine people and events that forged Franklin D. Roosevelt’s presidency. Session topics include the following:

September 25: FDR’S Infamy: Japanese Internment During WWII

October 2: He Rose From His Wheelchair to Lift the Nation From Its Knees

October 9: Louis Howe: The President Maker

October 16: Frances Perkins: The New Deal’s First Lady

October 23: Harry Hopkins: Franklin Roosevelt’s Assistant President and Friend

October 30: FDR and the Jewish Question: Did the President Do Enough?

Class Limit: 65

Presenters: Linda Bouchey and Al Vinck have taught at Bard, Vassar, and Marist LLIs, the National Park Service, and other historical groups. They are National Park Service interpreters and wrote the Roosevelt Genealogy sold by the National Park Service. They are former Wilderstein Preservation and Roosevelt Vanderbilt board members and co-chaired the Roosevelt Educational Memorial for the Hyde Park Central School District. Linda Bouchey is a retired Hyde Park Central School District teacher, and an FDR Library Museum and Archives volunteer. Al Vinck is a retired chair of the Hyde Park Central School District History Department. 

Producer: Margaret Shuhala

Friday: 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: This course will examine the relationship between the national and state governments. We will begin with developing an understanding of the framework of the Constitution and the major events and enlightened thinking that led the framers to create it.

Class Limit:  none

Presenter: Robert Beaury (LLI) is a retired high school social studies teacher and college adjunct.

Producer: Emily Michael

Friday: 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: Who was Sigmund Freud? What were his major contributions? Why was he so controversial in his time and why does he remain so today? In this course we will discuss some of the theories Freud developed that made him one of the greatest thinkers of the 20th century. We will explore the evolution of his process in light of his background and the Victorian era as well as the importance of the development of the technique of psychoanalysis. We will also discuss past and current advances in psychoanalysis.

Class Limit: 25

Presenter: Dale Bernstein (LLI) is a licensed psychotherapist, in private practice since 1972. She trained in Freudian psychoanalysis at the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research in New York City. A founding member of the New York Association of Feminist Therapists, she also has specialties in couples and group psychotherapy. She does pro bono work in crisis management in Rhinebeck.

Producer: Merrill Mishaan

Friday: 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

September 25; October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; November 6

Description: As the saying goes, everyone is a critic. But it’s harder to write cultural criticism than to simply give it a grade, or stars, or a thumbs up. It’s harder to read, as well.  This is a survey, discussion, and workshop in the history, varieties, and evolution of cultural criticism. There will be readings of key essays and reviews and possible guest presenters. Participants will be invited to write their own short art review for class discussion.

 Class Limit: 25

Presenter: Lisa Schwarzbaum (LLI) was a nationally known critic at Entertainment Weekly from 1994-2013. She served on the selection committee of the New York Film Festival from 2004-2008 and was co-host of a weekly movie review program on CNN from 1998-2001. She appeared regularly on radio and TV including as co-host on Roger Ebert at the Movies. She is a member of the National Film Critics Circle.

Producer: Linda Legendre

Credits

Curriculum Committee

Anne Sunners, Chair
Irene Esposito, Secretary
Regina Armstrong
Dorothy Baran
Bob Blacker
Anne Brueckner
Jane Diamond
Ellen Foreman
Susan Hinkle
Dacie Kershaw
Linda Legendre
Emily Michael
Chuck Mishaan
Merrill Mishaan
Margaret Moran
Cathy Reinis
Linda Scherr
Margaret Shuhala
Bill Tuel
Leslie Weinstock

Catalog Committee

Bill Tuel, Chair
Susan Hinkle
Deborah Lanser, Catalog Editor
Margaret Shuhala
Tim Sullivan, Green Reader
Betsy Tuel

Hudson River at Bard

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Join us for FALL Semester 2020

Course Dates: September 24th through November 6th
Fall Registration starts September 1, 2020


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